Welcome from
Eric O. Ledermann

about.me/ericledermann twitter.com/ericledermann facebook.com/ericledermann Eric Ledermann

Thanks for stopping in. Pour yourself a cup o' jo, take a load off your feet, and check out what's here. You are looking at my ramblings about issues of faith, life and culture—they are my own and are not necessarily shared by those with whom I work, live or otherwise engage.

My journey has led my family and me across the country where I have been introduced to a lot of people and a lot of different ways of doing things. One passion, though, runs through all these experiences: building beloved and sustainable community. "Sustainable" community is kind of a strange notion, as communities (people) change constantly, and things are always in motion. So, the latest chapter of my life has led me to the notion of "impermanence"—not an idea that comes naturally in a culture that likes to build monuments to our greatness for future generations to view and admire. But, I'm trying to practice my awareness of impermanence—the idea that nothing is permanent, nothing is forever, and things are always in flux.

Feel free to share your comments and engage in any conversation that may be happening here, but just know that I do reserve the right to delete any spam or anything I deem inappropriate or offensive. I look forward to dialoguing with anyone who cares to dialogue!

Peace and blessings,
                   Eric Ledermann

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Prayer of Thanksgiving

I haven’t posted anything the past couple of weeks, since the election. I have been listening to people’s reactions and trying to process what happened and what it might mean for our nation and world. Each year our local Tempe Interfaith Fellowship hosts an Interfaith Thanksgiving Service. It is an amazing service, and a highlight of the season for many. This year I was asked to offer the Prayer of Thanksgiving, which also served as […]

BlogPost: Holy Week – Day 5

Agitators are dangerous. They can insight fear and frustration, and often violence, with or without knowing it. Last Saturday I participated in a counter-rally calling out presidential frontrunner Donal Trump for his racist, misogynistic, and down-right hateful rhetoric. We were there to agitate, but also raise the flag on the language coming from a person who is vying for one of the most powerful positions in the world. Prior to Saturday, opposing Donald Trump’s run […]

BlogPost: Holy Week – Day 4

With every step Jesus took into and within Jerusalem, he pushed against the status quo of fear and oppression. He pushed the Jewish leadership in their cooperation with the empire. He pushed the Roman leadership, riding that thin line between nuisance and seditionist. The leaders saw that the crowd was getting behind Jesus, drawn to his preaching of love and justice (probably more the justice than the love). They needed to figure out how to […]

BlogPost: Oracles to the People

Marc Chagall, “The Prophet Jeremiah,” 1968, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marc_Chagall (accessed October 20, 2015).

I’m taking a class at McCormick Theological Seminary about the prophets of the Hebrew scriptures. We’re focusing primarily on the book of Jeremiah. It’s been a fascinating look at the books of the bible that have for a long time called to me and that I have for a long time avoided because so often I feel like I don’t understand them. […]

BlogPost: The Narrative of the Eucharistic Life

As I shared in my last post, I’ve been working toward a D.Min. I’ve shared before why, and it has less to do with the degree than a deep desire for some structure in my faith life (in other words, help me get control of the mess going on in my head).

My final project focuses on the intersection of Eucharistic theology and social ethics—how our Eucharistic practices (Lord’s Supper) inform, interact, and even […]

BlogPost: Hate and Violence in Tempe, Arizona

I seem to be hearing of more reports of hateful and violent behavior by certain ultra conservative Christian groups on and around the ASU campus, let alone Tempe. A local “pastor” (I use that term loosely) called for the execution of all homosexuals, among other dangerous statements he has made. There have been incidents in which our friends in the Muslim community have been harassed outside their Mosque on Friday nights as they enter […]

BlogPost: Lenten Journal – Day 19

I found this quote today in my email inbox:

A [person] will be imprisoned in a room with a door that’s unlocked and opens inwards; as long as it does not occur to [that person] to pull rather than push. -Ludwig Wittgenstein

I had to look up Ludwig Wittgenstein. He was an early 20th century Austrian-British philosopher. He suffered severe personal depression after World War I, giving away all his money to his brothers […]

BlogPost: Lenten Journal – Day 5

Somehow my posts from last week and yesterday got messed up, and two of them didn’t post and are now lost to the mystery of the internet. Apologies to those who were reading them. Not a good start to my Lenten discipline. I think the issue is cleared up, so here we go…

In today’s Daily Lectionary we read Hebrews 3.1-11. In verses 5-6 we are likened to a house, our bodies are dwelling places […]