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Eric O. Ledermann

about.me/ericledermann twitter.com/ericledermann facebook.com/ericledermann Eric Ledermann

Thanks for stopping in. Pour yourself a cup o' jo, take a load off your feet, and check out what's here. You are looking at my ramblings about issues of faith, life and culture—they are my own and are not necessarily shared by those with whom I work, live or otherwise engage.

My journey has led my family and me across the country where I have been introduced to a lot of people and a lot of different ways of doing things. One passion, though, runs through all these experiences: building beloved and sustainable community. "Sustainable" community is kind of a strange notion, as communities (people) change constantly, and things are always in motion. So, the latest chapter of my life has led me to the notion of "impermanence"—not an idea that comes naturally in a culture that likes to build monuments to our greatness for future generations to view and admire. But, I'm trying to practice my awareness of impermanence—the idea that nothing is permanent, nothing is forever, and things are always in flux.

Feel free to share your comments and engage in any conversation that may be happening here, but just know that I do reserve the right to delete any spam or anything I deem inappropriate or offensive. I look forward to dialoguing with anyone who cares to dialogue!

Peace and blessings,
                   Eric Ledermann

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BlogPost: #GA222 of the #PCUSA Opens with Worship

GA-logo-roundThe 222nd gathering of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church (USA) opened with worship this afternoon. While for many GA222 stared a couple of days ago (especially for staff, vendors, and YAADs), today was the official start.

The moderator of the 221st General Assembly, Dr. Heath Rada, preached a sermon from Genesis 45.1-15, when Joseph reveals himself to his brothers who had sold him into slavery. Moderator Rada called the PC(USA) to a time of reconciliation, acknowledging the deep theological and political divides within our nation that are being reflected in the Church. Thousands of congregations have left and are seeking dismissal from the PC(USA) in recent years as the denomination has shifted more toward traditionally liberal stances on issues like same-sex marriage and LGBTQ ordination.

Dr. Heat Rada, Moderator of the 221st General Assembly preaches at opening worship of the 222nd General Assembly of the PC(USA)

Dr. Heath Rada, Moderator of the 221st General Assembly preaches at opening worship of the 222nd General Assembly of the PC(USA)

But, somehow, in the midst of the turmoil, sadness, grief, and even anger, the spirit of this GA still seems upbeat, especially compared to the 220th General Assembly four years ago in Pittsburgh. The spirit of hope and reconciliation continues from when we gathered as a denomination in Detroit, Michigan, two years ago.

Moderator Rada breaks the bread as the 222nd Genal Assembly opens with the Eucharist.

Moderator Rada breaks the bread as the 222nd General Assembly opens with the Eucharist.

There we witnessed a city enduring the birth-pangs of healing in the aftermath of the 2008 recession that hit this city especially hard. In some sense, that city gave #GA221 commissioners hope.

We may be a much smaller denomination than we were a few years ago, but the Spirit of God is still moving, nudging, and shaking. Mostly, G.A. is an opportunity to remember that are part of something much bigger than ourselves or our local congregations. May all of us, whether watching live or through the live-stream, experience the presence of God’s Holy Spirit here in Portland and in our lives together.

Stay tuned for more from #GA222. Watch the live-stream of the election of the next moderator/co-moderator at www.pcusa.org/ga222.

G.A. is a time of gathering, re-connecting, and remembering we are part of something much larger than ourselves.

G.A. is a time of gathering, re-connecting, and remembering we are part of something much larger than ourselves.

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