Welcome from
Eric O. Ledermann

about.me/ericledermann twitter.com/ericledermann facebook.com/ericledermann Eric Ledermann

Thanks for stopping in. Pour yourself a cup o' jo, take a load off your feet, and check out what's here. You are looking at my ramblings about issues of faith, life and culture—they are my own and are not necessarily shared by those with whom I work, live or otherwise engage.

My journey has led my family and me across the country where I have been introduced to a lot of people and a lot of different ways of doing things. One passion, though, runs through all these experiences: building beloved and sustainable community. "Sustainable" community is kind of a strange notion, as communities (people) change constantly, and things are always in motion. So, the latest chapter of my life has led me to the notion of "impermanence"—not an idea that comes naturally in a culture that likes to build monuments to our greatness for future generations to view and admire. But, I'm trying to practice my awareness of impermanence—the idea that nothing is permanent, nothing is forever, and things are always in flux.

Feel free to share your comments and engage in any conversation that may be happening here, but just know that I do reserve the right to delete any spam or anything I deem inappropriate or offensive. I look forward to dialoguing with anyone who cares to dialogue!

Peace and blessings,
                   Eric Ledermann

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Coffee at #GA222 – Visit Café Justo

imageIf you love coffee (or you know someone who does), you must stop by booth #553 in the Exhibit Hall and learn the story of Café Justo (Just Coffee). In 2002 this coffee cooperative was birthed by a partnership that included the Presbyterian Border Ministry of Frontera de Cristo and Lily of the Valley Church in Agua Prieta, Sonora, in response to immigration, of all things.

I serve a church at ground zero for the immigration debate: Arizona. Café Justo offers an alternate response to the wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Rather than trying to stop people from coming to the U.S., we need to ask why they’re coming. Many are leaving farms that have been shut down due to unfair trade policies. Who can compete with corn in the U.S. that is heavily subsidized by the government?

Adrian Gonzalez, Director of Customer Relations at Café Justo, shares the story of the coop at a GA attendee. (Photo: Eric O. Ledermann)

Adrian Gonzalez, Director of Customer Relations at Café Justo, shares the story of the coop at a GA attendee. (Photo: Eric O. Ledermann)

Café Justo is a cooperative of family farmers in Chiapas in southern Mexico, Veracruz in central Mexico, and Agua Prieta in northern Mexico. The fruit is grown in Chiapas. Some of it is decaffeinated in Veracruz. And all of it is roasted in Chiapas, just across the border from Douglas, Arizona. On each bag of coffee is the name of the grower member of the coop.

Café Justo is about sustainable wages that help those who want to stay in their communities, rather than migrate to the U.S. The grow some of the best coffee beans I’ve had the pleasure of tasting. At only $12 per bag (or 3 for $30), you are sharing in helping families stay together, promote a quality product, and building relationships across our borders. Also, they’re offering free samples at the booth!

 

Catherine May of Tempe, Arizona, shares the story of Café Justo in the Exhibit Hall of the 222nd General Assembly of the PC(USA).

Catherine May of Tempe, Arizona, shares the story of Café Justo in the Exhibit Hall of the 222nd General Assembly of the PC(USA).

Dan Abbott of Tempe, Arizona, shares the story of Café Justo in the Exhibit Hall of the 222nd General Assembly of the PC(USA).

Dan Abbott of Tempe, Arizona, shares the story of Café Justo in the Exhibit Hall of the 222nd General Assembly of the PC(USA).

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