Welcome from
Eric O. Ledermann

about.me/ericledermann twitter.com/ericledermann facebook.com/ericledermann Eric Ledermann

Thanks for stopping in. Pour yourself a cup o' jo, take a load off your feet, and check out what's here. You are looking at my ramblings about issues of faith, life and culture—they are my own and are not necessarily shared by those with whom I work, live or otherwise engage.

My journey has led my family and me across the country where I have been introduced to a lot of people and a lot of different ways of doing things. One passion, though, runs through all these experiences: building beloved and sustainable community. "Sustainable" community is kind of a strange notion, as communities (people) change constantly, and things are always in motion. So, the latest chapter of my life has led me to the notion of "impermanence"—not an idea that comes naturally in a culture that likes to build monuments to our greatness for future generations to view and admire. But, I'm trying to practice my awareness of impermanence—the idea that nothing is permanent, nothing is forever, and things are always in flux.

Feel free to share your comments and engage in any conversation that may be happening here, but just know that I do reserve the right to delete any spam or anything I deem inappropriate or offensive. I look forward to dialoguing with anyone who cares to dialogue!

Peace and blessings,
                   Eric Ledermann

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Divest to Re-invest at #GA222

img_0447-1Yesterday a letter was presented at a press conference in support of an overture from the Presbytery of San Francisco calling the entities of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) to divest from fossil fuel companies. The letter was written by Rick Ufford-Chase, moderator of the 216th General Assembly (2004) and signed by nine former moderators, including the Rev. Bruce Reyes-Chow and the Rev. Dr. Susan Andrews who spoke at the press conference. Rev. Reyes-Chow recently blogged about his support of divestment here.

The PC(USA) is not new to divestment as it seeks to shape its financial investment policies around the values of her theology and ethics. In 2014 the denomination rose to national prominence as it voted to divest from companies determined to be perpetuating violence between Israel and Palestine.

Fossil Free PCUSA demonstrators lined up outside the Oregon Convention Center trying to persuade commissioners to support the PC(USA) pulling funds from fossil fuel companies. (Photo: Eric O. Ledermann)

Fossil Free PCUSA demonstrators lined up outside the Oregon Convention Center trying to persuade commissioners to support the PC(USA) pulling funds from fossil fuel companies. (Photo: Eric O. Ledermann)

Divestment is controversial, perceived by some to be removing the PC(USA)’s voice from the table and by others to be a prophetic statement in support of God’s creation.

At the press conference, the Rev. John Fife, moderator of the 204th General Assembly (1992), said, “Never in the history of this nation, and beyond this nation, has any meaningful social change occurred without making the move from advocacy, protest and education to active non-violent resistance strategies.”

Rev. Fife knows something about prophetic advocacy, protest, and education. In the 1980s Rev. Fife pastored Southside Presbyterian Church in Tucson, Arizona, and helped lead a massive Sanctuary Movement in the U.S. as thousands of refugees fled the violence of civil war and death squads in Central America. He was eventually convicted for actively helping refugees cross the border illegally, though he spent no time in jail.

The Rev. John Fife, known for his participation in the Sanctuary Movement during the 1980s, testifies in support of fossil fuel divestment at the Immigration and Environmental Issues Committee.

The Rev. John Fife, known for his participation in the Sanctuary Movement during the 1980s, testifies in support of fossil fuel divestment at the Immigration and Environmental Issues Committee. (Photo: Eric O. Ledermann)

Rev. Fife went on to say that he believes the overture will help move the church into the place of nonviolent resistant to the status quo of consumption, one of the most important ethical issues of our day.

The Rev. Greg Allen-Pickett beautifully described the issue before Committee 9 as “a tale of two approaches”—divest from fossil fuel companies (Item 09-01) or leverage our investments to initiate change and enter a period of discernment and study around divestment as a tool (Item 09-02).

What Greg lifts up is how the tide has moved to the point that few, if anyone, argue against or deny climate change.

 

 

 

Fossil Free PCUSA demonstrates outside the assembly hall, forming a gauntlet of signs and images promoting divestment from fossil free companies. (Photo: Eric O. Ledermann)

Fossil Free PCUSA demonstrates outside the assembly hall, forming a gauntlet of signs and images promoting divestment from fossil free companies. (Photo: Eric O. Ledermann)

Pro-divestment demonstrators stood outside the Oregon Convention Center Monday morning, advocating for the PC(USA) to divest from fossil fuel companies. (Photo: Eric O. Ledermann)

Pro-divestment demonstrators stood outside the Oregon Convention Center Monday morning, advocating for the PC(USA) to divest from fossil fuel companies. (Photo: Eric O. Ledermann)

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